YA myths debunked 

Ask people who don’t like to read a lot of YA and they’ll all tell you roughly the same things. It’s boring. It’s too easy. It’s too fluffy. I’ve heard these time and time again, and I’m here to set the record straight.

There are quite a few common misconceptions about YA fiction, but these are the most common ones I felt really needed to be addressed.

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Review: Clean by Juno Dawson

Challenge criteria: A book about a problem facing society today.

(Disclaimer: I was sent this book by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This has in no way affected my opinion of the book, nor the outcome of the review.)

Before I start with this review, I need to mention that there are quite a lot of trigger warnings associated with this book. Drug use, drug abuse, abusive relationships, death, these are just some of them. Do keep that in mind before you read this book.

Blurb:

I can feel it swimming through my veins like glitter … it’s liquid gold.

When socialite Lexi Volkov almost overdoses, she thinks she’s hit rock bottom. She’s wrong. Rock bottom is when she’s forced into an exclusive rehab facility.

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Review: Simon vs the Homo Sapians Agenda by Becky Albertalli

Challenge criteriaA book with an LGBT protagonist

Blurb:

Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. Now Simon is actually being blackmailed: if he doesn’t play wingman for class clown Martin, his sexual identity will become everyone’s business. Worse, the privacy of Blue, the pen name of the boy he’s been emailing, will be compromised.
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Review: Things a Bright Girl Can Do by Sally Nicholls

This book did not fit any of my challenge criteria.

Blurb:

Through rallies and marches, in polite drawing rooms and freezing prison cells and the poverty-stricken slums of the East End, three courageous young women join the fight for the vote.

Evelyn is seventeen, and though she is rich and clever, she may never be allowed to follow her older brother to university. Enraged that she is expected to marry her childhood sweetheart rather than be educated, she joins the Suffragettes, and vows to pay the ultimate price for women’s freedom.

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