Review: The C Word by Lisa Lynch

Challenge criteria: A memoir, biography, or book of creative non fiction

Blurb:

The incredibly moving, darkly humorous account of one woman’s fight against breast cancer. Now a BBC Drama starring Sheridan Smith. 

‘Carrie Bradshaw fell in Dior, I fell in Debenhams. It was May 2008, and it was spectacular. Uncomfortable heels + slippy floor + head turned by a cocktail dress = thwack. Arms stretched overhead, teeth cracking on floor tiles, chest and knees breaking the fall. It was theatrical, exaggerated, a perfect 6.0. And it was Significant Moment #1 in discovering that I had grade-three breast cancer.’

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Review: And Then We Collided by Josh Baldwin and Rosanna Threakall

Challenge criteria: A book by two authors.

Disclaimer: I am reviewing this book as part of a blog tour organised by the authors. This does not affect my opinion of the book, nor the outcome of this review, in any way.

Blurb:

Eli Black seems to have it all. Power, money and a best friend who’s at his every beck and call but when he starts to doubt his father’s love and goes on a road trip to find out the past, he discovers the past isn’t only hiding bad memories.

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Books on my Long Term TBR

This post is part of Six for Sunday run by Steph from A Little But a Lot.

One of these days, my TBR shelf is going to collapse on me and lead to my untimely death. What isn’t helping is that I keep ignoring my already voluminous TBR and buying brand new tomes to get through.

I have a long list of books that have been on my TBR shelf for years, but I still haven’t gotten to reading them yet. Maybe it’s time to pick something from there and get it ticked off once and for all before heading to Easons again.

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Review: Only Ever Yours by Louise O’Neill

Challenge criteria: A book about feminism.

Blurb:

In a world in which baby girls are no longer born naturally, women are bred in schools, trained in the arts of pleasing men until they are ready for the outside world. At graduation, the most highly rated girls become “companions”, permitted to live with their husbands and breed sons until they are no longer useful.

For the girls left behind, the future – as a concubine or a teacher – is grim.

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