Review: The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

This book did not fit any of my challenge criteria.

Blurb:

Aging and reclusive Hollywood movie icon Evelyn Hugo is finally ready to tell the truth about her glamorous and scandalous life. But when she chooses unknown magazine reporter Monique Grant for the job, no one is more astounded than Monique herself. Why her? Why now?

Monique is not exactly on top of the world. Her husband has left her, and her professional life is going nowhere. Regardless of why Evelyn has selected her to write her biography, Monique is determined to use this opportunity to jumpstart her career.

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Tag Thursday: Reading Your Country Tag

St Patrick’s Day has just been and gone, and it’s made me feel very patriotic. It’s the perfect time to take the Reading My Country Tag and chat a little about the Emerald Isle. This tag originally was created by Booktuber Cook Read Create, but I’ve decided to take it as a written exam and spare you the horror of my voice.

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Review: Children of the Famine Trilogy by Marita Conlon McKenna

I first read the Children of the Famine Trilogy when I was younger. I can vivdly remember my teacher in 4th Class (so when I was 10) reading the first book aloud, and I devoured the other two in my own time. A recent episode of the podcast Juvenalia, where the first book was discussed, brought the trilogy back to my attention. I sped through them all in about two days.

I’m going to keep the reviews of the three books in one place, to make them a little easier to find/collate. These books are all perfect if you’re looking to learn some more about Irish history, or if you’re a teacher and can’t find something to read aloud to the class (I can tell you from experience that it will fascinate your students.)

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Review: How to Stop Time by Matt Haig

Challenge criteria: A book about time travel.

Blurb:

“The first rule is that you don’t fall in love, ‘ he said… ‘There are other rules too, but that is the main one. No falling in love. No staying in love. No daydreaming of love. If you stick to this you will just about be okay.'”

A love story across the ages – and for the ages – about a man lost in time, the woman who could save him, and the lifetimes it can take to learn how to live
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Review: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Socitey by Mary Ann Schaffer

Challenge criteria: A book with a fruit or vegetable in the title.

Blurb:

A moving tale of post-war friendship, love and books, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society is a captivating and completely irresistible novel of enormous depth and heart.

It’s 1946, and as Juliet Ashton sits at her desk in her Chelsea flat, she is stumped. A writer of witty newspaper columns during the war, she can’t think of what to write next. Out of the blue, she receives a letter from one Dawsey Adams of Guernsey – by chance he’s acquired a book Juliet once owned – and, emboldened by their mutual love of books, they begin a correspondence.
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