Review: Good Girl Bad Blood by Holly Jackson

This book did not fit any of my challenge prompts.

Blurb:

More dark secrets are exposed in this true-crime fueled mystery.

Pip is not a detective anymore.

With the help of Ravi Singh, she released a true-crime podcast about the murder case they solved together last year. The podcast has gone viral, yet Pip insists her investigating days are behind her.

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Favourite Books by Black Authors

This year I’ve really made an effort to diversify my reading shelves. Throughout the last few years my reading has been pretty white author dominated, and it’s time to change that.

So, I’ve got some authors of colour I’ve loved, and maybe you will really enjoy their books too. I’ve collected a list across several genres and reading tastes. There should for sure be something here you’ll enjoy.

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Review: Take a Hint Dani Brown by Talia Hibbert

Challenge prompt: A book that discusses body positivity

Blurb:

Danika Brown knows what she wants: professional success, academic renown, and an occasional roll in the hay to relieve all that career-driven tension. But romance? Been there, done that, burned the T-shirt. Romantic partners, whatever their gender, are a distraction at best and a drain at worst. So Dani asks the universe for the perfect friend-with-benefits–someone who knows the score and knows their way around the bedroom.

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September 2021 Reading Wrap Up

September means chaos for a lot of people. They’re back to school, or sending their children to school or college for the first time. This year, I had my own new adventure in September.

I moved across the country in September, and I spent most of the month living out of suitcases and boxes while trying to organise all my furniture and my things. Let’s see if that left any time for me to get some reading done.

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Review: The Bride Test by Helen Hoang

This book did not fit any of my challenge prompts.

Blurb:

Khai Diep has no feelings. Well, he feels irritation when people move his things or contentment when ledgers balance down to the penny, but not big, important emotions—like grief. And love. He thinks he’s defective. His family knows better—that his autism means he just processes emotions differently. When he steadfastly avoids relationships, his mother takes matters into her own hands and returns to Vietnam to find him the perfect bride.

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