Review: Two Can Keep A Secret by Karen McManus

This book did not fit any of my challenge criteria.

Blurb:

Ellery’s never been to Echo Ridge, but she’s heard all about it. It’s where her aunt went missing at age sixteen, never to return. Where a Homecoming Queen’s murder five years ago made national news. And where Ellery now has to live with a grandmother she barely knows, after her failed-actress mother lands in rehab. No one knows what happened to either girl, and Ellery’s family is still haunted by their loss.

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Review: Perfect Match by Zoe May

This book did not fit any of my challenge criteria.

Blurb:

Can you ever find true love online?

Sophia Jones is an expert in all things online dating: the best sites, how to write a decent bio, which questions to ask and the right type of photos to use. The only thing she’s not so great at? Picking the guys…

After sitting through yet another dreadful date with a man who isn’t quite what she expected, Sophia is just about ready to give up on the whole dating scene. But her flatmate, Kate, persuades her to give it one more chance, only this time she must create a profile describing her ‘perfect’ man.

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Review: This is Going to Hurt by Adam Kay

Challenge criteria: A book with an item of clothing or accessory on the cover

Blurb:

Adam Kay was a junior doctor from 2004 until 2010, before a devastating experience on a ward caused him to reconsider his future. He kept a diary throughout his training, and This Is Going to Hurt intersperses tales from the front line of the NHS with reflections on the current crisis. The result is a first-hand account of life as a junior doctor in all its joy, pain, sacrifice and maddening bureaucracy, and a love letter to those who might at any moment be holding our lives in their hands.


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What I liked:

This is an amazing and insightful look into life on a maternity ward in the UK. I’m not from the UK, nor do I live there, but I think we’ve all heard about the trials and terrors of the NHS at the moment. Adam brings so much humour into the diary it’s infectuous (no pun intended.)

Given the subject matter, and some of the delicate cases in this book, it feels like saying I enjoyed it is wrong. But I did. It’s humour is spectacular, and the footnotes bring a wealth of knowledge about the OBGYN department of your local hospital. Moreover, it will make you despair for the healthcare professionals working there. You’ll see them in a whole new light once you’ve finished this book.

What I didn’t like:

LOTS of squeamish moments in this book. I did read them, but often with my legs crossed or my heart in my mouth. I had some help, though, to prepare for them; I asked Emma from Drinking by my Shelf for her list of particularly hard to read passages. For readers with light stomachs, it’s a godsend.

Out of five:

Has to be a five star read. It’s one of the best books I’ve read this year, and totally lived up to the hype bestowed upon it.

 

Review: Never Greener by Ruth Jones

This book did not fit into any of my challenge criteria.

Blurb:

In her unmissable debut, actress and screenwriter Ruth Jones shows us the dangers of trying to recapture that which was once lost and failing to realise the beauty of what we already have.

We spend most of our lives wishing we were somewhere else or someone else, or looking forward or harping back. Always thinking the grass is greener on the other side. But it never is. It’s still grass. Just a different patch of it, that’s all.

The past has a habit of tracking us down. And tripping us up.

When Kate was twenty-two, she had an intense and passionate affair with a married man, Callum, which ended in heartbreak. Kate thought she’d never get over it.

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How to Read in a Foreign Language

When I moved to Germany a few years ago, I knew a sacrifice I’d have to make was finding English language books easily. I was half right. There are some pretty big English language sections in my local bookshops, but they’re pretty pricey now so I don’t treat myself to a book as much as I used to. (That hasn’t really stopped me buying them at all, though.)

I had an epiphany a couple of months ago.  If I want to improve my German, which I’ve been trying to do, it’s about time I incorporate it into my daily life a little more. What easier way to do it than try to read a book in German? I knew exactly which book was going to help me on my journey.

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